Holding One Another Up in Prayer

By Jamie Harms

In Exodus 17, Moses along with Aaron and Hur watched from an overlooking hill as God’s people battled their enemies. As long as Moses’ hands were extended heavenward, the Israelites experienced victory. When Moses’ hands slumped from fatigue, the enemies began to route Israel. Thus, until the Amalakites were completely defeated, Aaron and Hur came alongside Moses and physically held up his hands when he could no longer do so on his own.

The story in Exodus reminds me of a story from my friend, Kathleen Harwood, that she shared with me of a time when she was newly married and struggling with how to interact with her father-in-law. He was having a hard time letting go of being the main recipient of his son’s attention, and she was having trouble being kind in her heart and with her words toward him. As Kathleen and her husband planned a trip to Florida to visit family, she confided in a friend that she was exhausted from praying for this situation and was stressed about the trip. I love the gift that her friend gave her as she departed on her trip. She said that Kathleen’s job was to focus her energy on one thing while in Florida — speaking kind words to her father-in-law. While Kathleen was on her trip, her friend said she would do the praying. She would cover the trip in prayer, including praying for Kathleen’s heart and actions toward her husband’s family. To know that she was covered in prayer was a freeing thing for Kathleen. She could focus on being kind, and her friend could do the praying.

As I connect with women this week, I am hearing a common theme of hard days starting to creep into our time at home. The adrenaline of the first few weeks of quarantine has worn off, and we can be left feeling heavy, anxious, or unmotivated. In the course of one day, I can swing between this heaviness and grief of seeing all the things that I have lost to thankfulness for the silver linings, then back again, and I know I am not alone. Like Kathleen, I can feel exhausted from praying for my situation and need a break. I need someone to hold up my hands like Aaron and Hur did for Moses and Kathleen’s friend did for her.  

The beauty of being a part of the body of Christ is that on those days when we have nothing left, our sisters in Christ can hold up our hands and cover us in prayer. I encourage you to find that friend or two who you can text when the going gets rough, and they can do the same for you. Essentially, build your own prayer team of ladies who can pray for you when you cannot pray for yourself and whom you can hold up in prayer on their rough days. On these hard days, you can also email requests to our confidential prayer team at prayer@university-fellowship.com.

We are not alone in our walks with Jesus. We walk together toward Him through the good times and the hard times.

Heavenly Father, We hold our sisters up in prayer today to You. Encourage them as they go about their day filled with responsibilities and new routines. Help them find time to grieve the things lost and in turn see the hope that only comes from You. Use them in mighty ways to be beacons of light and hope to their family and neighbors. Overwhelm them with your peace and fill them with joy despite the circumstances. Keep them safe in your hand and cover them in your grace. Amen.

3 thoughts on “Holding One Another Up in Prayer

  1. I love this story and it fills me each time I retell it to another friend in need –

    Thanks for retelling and the inspiration..

    Another friend of Kathleen….

    Like

  2. This really hits the spot, Jamie, even about trouble loving an in-law. I appreciate your wise encouragement.

    Like

  3. So true. There have been many times in my life when I felt I had no words left for God in my supplication of a particular issue and I was relieved to have a friend intercede on my behalf. I am honored when loved ones ask for me to pray for them as well.

    Like

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